June 29th, 2014
In 1958, when 12-year-old André [the Giant]’s acromegaly prevented him from taking the school bus, [Samuel Beckett] the author of Waiting for Godot, whom he knew as his dad’s card buddy and neighbor in rural Moulien, France, volunteered for transport duty. It was a standing gig, with no other passengers. André recalled that they mostly talked about cricket …
I love to picture this …

(Source: openculture.com)

June 23rd, 2014

Seven images from Google Image search, keyword: qiu

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

KERTÉSZ

Actually, you’re completely right. It’s exactly like that. We’ve got the man who was born in Auschwitz, and then Judit, the woman who experiences Auschwitz through him and who attempts to find a conclusion to her own history. But then she escapes that world and marries a man who is untouched by totalitarianism. She decides to have children, and thus commits herself to life. That was the secret, the gesture—bearing children is the gesture that creates the possibility of continued life. Faced with choosing between life and death, she opts for life.

All right, that’s enough. That was my last interview.

INTERVIEWER

For today?

KERTÉSZ

Forever. Now it’s done.

The Paris Review interview (2)

(Source: theparisreview.org)

2012040606 南海均安 鸟网 (by Qiu-)

2012040606 南海均安 鸟网 (by Qiu-)

INTERVIEWER

Is there perhaps a redemptive quality to writing itself?

KERTÉSZ

Not for everybody.

The Paris Review interview (1)

(Source: theparisreview.org)

Anyone travelling along this path as it is unrolled before us, sentence after lovely sentence, over and over again senses with a shudder how deep is the abyss on either side, how sometimes the daylight seems to fade as the shadows gather from afar, and often is almost extinguished by the suggestion of death.
W.G. Sebald, on Gottfried Keller, in A Place in the Country.
June 18th, 2014
(by boneyabroad)
Llanberis Pass. It’s the light falling and shifting on the mountainsides I miss most.

(by boneyabroad)

Llanberis Pass. It’s the light falling and shifting on the mountainsides I miss most.

June 17th, 2014

In general, this half hour piece on Purcell’s aria is engaging, but if you have never heard Jeff Buckley sing Dido’s lament, it is worth skipping ahead to 22:30 or so and listening to cellist and composer Phillip Sheppard talk about the day he performed the piece with Buckley.

Also, someone on Youtube has done a decent enough job of cleaning up the recording, if you’d like to simply listen to it.

It’s not my fault if you cry. Sheesh.

June 12th, 2014

Which is worse …

describing a character as ‘promiscuously dressed’; or describing a character as ‘Muslim-looking’?

(Yes, it’s marking time again.)

May 22nd, 2014
kafkawasaclimber:

Feeling the fear on Ithica (22) at Eaglestone Rock. Super stiff for a 22, but beautiful moves.
Photo by Adyn Annetts. More awesome climbing can be found at the CruxDepartment Facebook page.

kafkawasaclimber:

Feeling the fear on Ithica (22) at Eaglestone Rock. Super stiff for a 22, but beautiful moves.

Photo by Adyn Annetts. More awesome climbing can be found at the CruxDepartment Facebook page.

April 29th, 2014

Wolf Hou, a pamphlet from Corbel Stone Press, that explores “the etymological history of the landscape.” Ordered for myself today.

(Source: richardskelton.wordpress.com)

April 21st, 2014

(Source: willywains, via ohmybuster)

April 20th, 2014
Some Easter Sunday bouldering. Boulder Rock, Western Australia.

Some Easter Sunday bouldering. Boulder Rock, Western Australia.

olhavan yö (by sami kuosmanen)

olhavan yö (by sami kuosmanen)