April 10th, 2014

INTERVIEWER

How do you feel about giving readings?

RYAN

I like to read my poems, but I don’t like to hear other people read theirs.

Kay Ryan, in her Paris Review interview.

Yup.

(Source: theparisreview.org)

April 8th, 2014

kateoplis:

How the brain operates when it’s reading a novel is completely different to how the brain operates when it’s reading the internet. When the brain reads the internet (or a cell phone or what have you) it’s constantly scanning for key words and visible anchors, such as gifs or flashy hyperlinks….

April 6th, 2014
One summer I simply fell in love with the word “interior.”
Poet Nathan Hoks, on one of my favourite blogs.
April 5th, 2014
reblog mandatory

reblog mandatory

(via r-is-for-raven)

I’ve been posting my own images on it gives it thew since the beginning, and I thought it might be nice to give them their own space. I’ll be reposting the images regularly on my new tumblr, but lovely it is to unfold, as well as adding fresh pictures from my archives. Feel free to follow!
itgivesitthew:

Somewhere on the Le Puy route of the Chemin de St Jacques.

I’ve been posting my own images on it gives it thew since the beginning, and I thought it might be nice to give them their own space. I’ll be reposting the images regularly on my new tumblr, but lovely it is to unfold, as well as adding fresh pictures from my archives. Feel free to follow!

itgivesitthew:

Somewhere on the Le Puy route of the Chemin de St Jacques.

(via butlovelyitistounfold)

Railay, Thailand

Railay, Thailand

April 4th, 2014

(Source: annyas.com)

April 3rd, 2014
I rise at six and work through the morning, every morning, seven days a week. I find the sun has a forlorn truth before noon. The words come unbidden. By early afternoon I have to quit.
Cormac McCarthy, in his Paris Review interview.

(Source: theparisreview.org)

March 31st, 2014
Sanctum (by Hengki Koentjoro)

Sanctum (by Hengki Koentjoro)

A Tailor at Work (by LlGC ~ NLW)

A Tailor at Work (by LlGC ~ NLW)

(Source: juliendouvier)

Speaking of As I Lay Dying, has anyone out there seen the James Franco film? What did you think?

I made it on the bevel.
1. There is more surface for the nails to grip
2. There is twice the gripping-surface to each seam.
3. The water will have to seep into it on a slant. Water moves easiest up and down or straight across.
4. In a house people are upright two thirds of the time. So the seams and joints are made up-and-down. Because the stress is up and down.
5. In a bed where people lie down all the time, the joints and seams are made sideways, because the stress is sideways.
6. Except.
7. A body is not square like a crosstie.
8. Animal magnetism.
9. The animal magnetism of a dead body makes the stress come slanting, so the seams and joints of a coffin are made on the bevel.
10. You can see by an old grave that the earth sinks down on the bevel.
11. While in a natural hole it sinks by the center, the stress being up-and-down.
12. So I made it on the bevel.
13. It makes a neater job.
A chapter narrated by Cash, in Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying
March 25th, 2014
You might not know this, but I’m a cloud geek, and I was late to work last night because I was so caught up with watching undulatus asperatus coming in from the Indian Ocean. This is the best shot I could get with my camera phone, so you’ll have to believe me when I tell you they looked a little like this, if less dramatic:

The asperatus is a ‘new’ kind of cloud, and not (yet?) found in the Cloud Atlas.

You might not know this, but I’m a cloud geek, and I was late to work last night because I was so caught up with watching undulatus asperatus coming in from the Indian Ocean. This is the best shot I could get with my camera phone, so you’ll have to believe me when I tell you they looked a little like this, if less dramatic:

The asperatus is a ‘new’ kind of cloud, and not (yet?) found in the Cloud Atlas.

Christopher Wordsworth settling in the Croesor area with his family to write (by LlGC ~ NLW)
I’m enthralled with the National Library of Wales’ Flickr page. This image caught my eye for its excellent outfits, and the hills behind, and because I know Croesor, but there is also that phrase: “settling … with his family to write.”
This piece in The Guardian, from son Saul Wordsworth, looks at his father’s relentless desire to write a ‘proper novel’, and what that meant for his family. “The many ironies of his name were not lost on him,” writes Saul.

Christopher Wordsworth settling in the Croesor area with his family to write (by LlGC ~ NLW)

I’m enthralled with the National Library of Wales’ Flickr page. This image caught my eye for its excellent outfits, and the hills behind, and because I know Croesor, but there is also that phrase: “settling … with his family to write.”

This piece in The Guardian, from son Saul Wordsworth, looks at his father’s relentless desire to write a ‘proper novel’, and what that meant for his family. “The many ironies of his name were not lost on him,” writes Saul.